Deploying claims-based authentication through ADFS - Security Center 5.8

Security Center Administrator Guide 5.8

series
Security Center 5.8
revised_modified
2020-08-17

You can use an Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) server as the claims provider for Security Center, and allow users outside your company to log on to your system by establishing a trust chain from third-party's ADFS servers to your company's Security Center main server.

Before you begin

It is assumed that you are familiar with the concepts of claims-based authentication and that your company's ADFS server is operational. For general information on ADFS installation and configuration, please refer to the documentation provided by Microsoft.

What you should know

For illustration purposes, let's assume that you want to allow external users from Company XYZ to access your company's Security Center system. Company XYZ has its own ADFS server that relies on its own Active Directory as claims provider. Company XYZ's servers are not on the same domain as your company's servers. Your company's ADFS server relies on Company XYZ's ADFS server as claims provider, and in turn, acts as claims provider to your company's Security Center system. Therefore, a chain of trusts must be established from the Company XYZ's Active Directory to the main server of your company's Security Center system.
NOTE: Security Center requires specific attributes as claims: Group and UPN (User Principal Name).

Best Practice: If you want to accept security groups from your local Active Directory as Security Center user groups, do not federate them through the ADFS role, but import them through the Active Directory role instead. The latter approach offers more functionalities, such as the synchronization of all standard fields (first name, last name, email address, and so on), custom field mapping, and the option to create all users at role synchronization time.

Procedure

  1. Configure the trust chain outside your company's domain.
    Make sure that the following tasks are performed by the Company XYZ's IT personnel.
    1. Add a claims provider trust to Company XYZ's ADFS server for Company XYZ's Active Directory.
    2. Add a relying party trust to Company XYZ's ADFS server for your company's ADFS server.
  2. Configure your local ADFS server as the claims provider for your Security Center system.
    1. On your company's ADFS server, open the AD FS Management snap-in.
    2. Add a claims provider trust to your ADFS for the third-party ADFS server.
    3. Configure the claim rules for the third-party claims provider.
    4. Add a relying party trust to your ADFS server for Security Center.
    5. Configure the claim rules for Security Center, the relying party you just added.
  3. Configure your Security Center system to receive claims from your local ADFS server.
    1. Connect to your Security Center system with Config Tool.
    2. Create a user group for each ADFS group you accept as Security Center user groups.
    3. Create the Active Directory Federation Services role.

Results

All users authenticated through ADFS must log on using fully qualified usernames, meaning that they must add their domain name to their usernames, such as in Username@CompanyXYZ.com.
IMPORTANT: There is currently a known issue regarding the use of a local Active Directory and ADFS. When you have external users authenticated through ADFS in your system, all users imported from your local Active Directory must also use fully qualified user names, even though they belong to the same domain as your Security Center system.